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44 More Soviet Stuff

More Soviet Stuff

Posted on October 13, 2006 by team


This is a collection of Soviet stuff.

Just 20 years ago only such things could be bought in shops or were at people’s homes.

Nothing different from this could be bought, anything was just in two-three versions, so if you wanted to buy some new coat you could choose only from 3 types of coat, not from thousands like in rest of the world.

These are examples of most typical things in Soviet Russia. I can bet that most of them were in EVERY Soviet house.
Oktyabrenok star

This star was a compulosry to wear by all Junior Schoolchildren (till the age of 11). There is a portrait of young Lenin on it.

Russian milk bottle

This was a typical bottle in wich milk was sold in Soviet Union.

Russian bookmarks

This is a pack of bookmarks for schoolchildren. The bookmarks were sold in such packs and were used to bookmark. This serie is with some poetry on it.

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44 Responses to “More Soviet Stuff”

  1. Marius says:

    Wow. Very interesting collection of the Soviet things! I can remember the most of them. Thanks! ))

  2. Urgat says:

    that bottle didn’t use for milk there whas “kefir” (caucasian drink from milk) in it. milk was selling in paper packs.

    PS why shops should have calculators if we were zombied multiplication tables??? i still remember that :)))

  3. Graycrow says:

    Urgat: oh, maybee in Moscow and other big sities milk was selling in paper pack, but I remember exactly that in our town milk and kefir was selling in those 0.5 liter bottles (in additional milk was also in bigger 1 liter bottles). And for few years we had milk and kefir in so called “triangle” packs but it ends in the middle of 80’s, maybe because packing line was broken and there was no funds or abilities to fix it.

  4. gulnara says:

    Do you think that the rest of the world got everything ready at once.I think they also have experienced all the stages.Did they drink milk immediately in the shop?Because nawdays western kids think that milk comes from the store.No idea of the cow.I know that scouts in the west also had their own attributes.I’m not sure the first condoms abroad looked like nowdays.America also once had passed thruogh “no drink” stage.What did they drink then?
    i should say most of the products were of good quality.Not all of them but I miss them.And it’s not fair to goal one gates.Earlier or later the world is experiencing the similar stages.

  5. gulnara says:

    Do you think that the rest of the world got everything ready at once.I think they also have experienced all the stages.Did they drink milk immediately in the shop?Because nawdays western kids think that milk comes from the store.No idea of the cow.I know that scouts in the west also had their own attributes.I’m not sure the first condoms abroad looked like nowdays.America also once had passed thruogh “no drink” stage.What did they drink instead?I wonder if the rest of the world counted with their fingers,at least we don’t deny the fact of using simple “schety”.
    i should say most of the products were of good quality.Not all of them but I miss them.And it’s not fair to goal one gates.Earlier or later the world is experiencing the similar stages.

  6. Seth Hall says:

    During prohibition in the US (when drinking alcohol was illegal) I don’t think that people replaced alcohol with other things. They just drank alcohol, but in private and in illegal bars. Alcohol was still available, just harder to get because it was illegal.

    It doesn’t surprise me that people didn’t have calculators until the 1990’s. In the US, calculators weren’t very common until the late 80’s and they weren’t that good even then. You had to plug them into the wall and they were very expensive.

  7. dRE says:

    Actually, I believe the world is coming down to this. Since Corporations are becoming bigger and take over markets everywhere, the only product you’ll find is their’s!
    Take Danone for example – in my Belgian supermarket you won’t find any other milk product except Danone’s! Fair? Don’t think so. At least in Russia we can choose milk products and find really natural ones, rather than eat Danone’s garbage. There are more examples. Soon it will all be the same.

  8. Leo Rolim says:

    “This thingie was very widely used untill 1990 in all Russian shops, because calculators were very rare in Soviet Russia.”

    This thingie is an Abacus, a ancient calculator very efficient in trained hands still very used in asian countries with high grades on Mathematics, like South Corea and Singapur. Wish I had the knowledge to use one of those in my Math classes :)

  9. Leo Rolim says:

    Abacus on Wikipedia. Unsuprisingly it has info on the Russian abacus :)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abacus

  10. yevgeny_pi says:

    Milk in pyramid pakets! Wow!

  11. LEVON says:

    Elektronika tape players from the photo are absolutely undestructable. You can do with it anything, throwing, soaking in water, using really bad qality tapes and it still operational. I have been Using it with some AOR japoneese electronic devices in really tough conditions, AORs were broken efery week, But elektronika never.

  12. ilyich says:

    Those pins are common in the west now– used to be big collectors items, I remember trading for them (I still have about 80 of them, various war and Souyuz commemoratives, the mini-Lenin youth pin, sports pins, pins from lake Baikal, etc.), but now they are all over ebay so collectors in the west don’t care so much anymore. Seems everyone in Russia is selling their pins on ebay now.

  13. ilyich says:

    Drinking perfume– reminds me of US drunks who use mouthwash when they can’t get liquor (easier to steal from grocery store than buy from liquor store).

  14. made_in_ussr says:

    when I was a boy I weared a star with a young Lenin =)

    THEN WAS A REVOLUTION !!!!! WEEEEEEEHHHHAAAAA!!!!!! I DID THROW IT AWAY AND BOUGHT MY FIRST JEANS!!! I WAS NINE =)

  15. Andrey says:

    When I was studing at shool to cut sleeve and design skull on back of shool uniform was really cool ))) I did it.

  16. W. Shedd says:

    The bag, called “Avoska” was named such from the word avos’, Russian for “Perhaps”. Everyone carried one folded in, just in case they found something they could buy, and carry it home.

    • John says:

      I think the Russian people were way ahead of north America in that respect. We are now finally tackling the issue of too much plastic bags in the landfills 30+ years after Russia.

  17. Soviet says:

    I believe, that all or most of these photos were taken from this website:

    http://www.76-82.ru/

    What about copyrights? Furthermore, a person who posted them here introduced his own bias in his comments.

  18. Loaff says:

    It’s not quite true, that calculators were uncommon in Russia until 90-s. Every kid in my school had one by 1985, because we needed them for maths classes – they were quite big programmable models (Electronica 61 if I’m not mistaken) that could work from batteries of plugged into a wall socket. In fact, I never was able to learn all the features of this calculator – they were too numerous and the ‘Life and Science’ magazine published extensive listings of serious and fun programs that could be loaded into this calculator, most of them ending with the ERROR message :-)

    But abacus was really widely used in shops until 90-s probably because it was inexpensive, durable (no electricity required and it’s hard to break) and convenient for performing simple arithmetic.

  19. Flippy says:

    Soviet (glass) milk bottles are remarkably similar to the ones we used to get in the north-eastern part of the US (Pittsburgh) untill they were discontinued in the late 1970’s or early 1980’s. Wow!

  20. Me says:

    The battery seems more like a fuse to me :)

  21. Jillian M says:

    I love coming to this site! I can spend hours perusing your stuff..it’s great!

  22. Krol says:

    The condom in square paper wrap, widely known as the “(Rubber) Article Number Two” is sure older than 1984. I was using it when I was in school back in 1970-s. That was quite a gamble actually: you could never be sure that it would last :)
    And drinking Troinoy (Triple) eau-de-cologne is not so bad, if you know how to do it. There was also a process for separating alcohol from glue with a hand drill AFAIR.
    Regardless, these photos are truly nostalgic.

  23. Andrew says:

    Hey, you should also add the popular 3-liter jar to this collection :)

    • Stephanie says:

      Are you talking about 3-litre jars of milk? I have a reference to what appears to be 3-litre jars of milk in a Soviet book, but I cannot find any evidence of these.

  24. kateruna says:

    so, what about copirights?
    why you delete my comment and ignore my request?

    all pictures was taken from http://www.76-82.ru

  25. glory says:

    The article is really great: I do remember all these things but only one problem as usual: there are some points which sound offensive for the Russians. Well… I don’t know… may be not for all, but for me they really do!!!Anyway the article itself is very interesting!!!!!!thanks…

  26. Konstantin says:

    All of this items so nostalgic.. I’ve seen these “abacus”, which is “schyoty” (counting thing) two years ago in one small bakery-shop in Ukraine, something is not changing you know. Every teenager is supposed to drink vodka now, but something is just can’t change in former USSR.

  27. john says:

    u.s. didnt have calculators till the 80’s and had to be plugged in?? gee.. my father had (and still does) a hand held, battery powered, scientific calculator made by texas instuments. complete with red LED screen. also, after doing a quick google search was able to discover that USSR was also producing similar if not exactly the same calculators made by elektronica by 1974.

  28. jack says:

    What is Fanta? In the usa, Fanta was(is?) a brand name of soda pop. That looks like a pizza box. What is Fanta in UUSR?

  29. At one point I thought I was the only person who was funny enough to write stuff like this.

  30. Johnny says:

    Actually this light blue milk pack is one of the most beautiful, yet simple milk pack designs I’ve ever seen! Did the web2.0-creators steal their designs from it? Looks so, almost the same голубой color and the same beauty of simplicity!

  31. Johnny says:

    Actually this light blue milk pack is one of the most beautiful, yet simple milk pack designs I’ve ever seen! Did the web2.0-creators steal their designs from it? Looks so, almost the same голубой color and the same beauty of simplicity!
    And how cool would it be to play Tennis in Wimbledon with tennis balls which have “Leningrad” written all over them!

    Funny, how these pictures from ex Soviet Union make me feel so nostalgic, although I have never been to USSR/Russia or any other Eastern country!

  32. SeanMoscow says:

    And this was used to store Soviet coins.

    This device was used mostly by a blind people.

  33. Chilean_dude says:

    Whatever happened to the comrades who ran this companies? They became millionaries when they became private?

    • eye says:

      In most cases, rather not. The people were just managers for a large system ran by the state. When the state crashed around 1990, the infrastructure was already crumbling. There were not enough resources to sustain the infrastructure completely, and one by one producing companies of all sectors would get difficulties getting their parts, raw products and materials, etc, which was further worsened by state-negotiated contracts loosing their effect. I think the split among russia and ukraine was also detriminal. These infrastructural weaknesses propagated down the supply chain, then further up as the suppliers couldn’t sell their intermediate goods. As those rotted away, wealth was effectively destroyed, leaving the consumer without the buying power to support the economic system.

      Wild Privatization gone wrong was another major factor. The company would be split up among employees, who would usually sell their share to an investment company (like MMM) for what turned out to be a worth of a single meal, because the share provided no dividents in the crashing economy. Almost all of those investment companies turned out to be mere pyramid fraud schemes, and weren’t interested in any investment or sustaining economy per se, and their bosses simply escaped with the money.

      I believe from all the post-soviet countries only Belarussia, and perhaps to a lesser state Georgia didn’t go that route. Belarussia retained the state-run commerce and renegotiated the contracts to rely on internal resources, to retain all companies in a weakened but running state, and now has a healthy economy.

      For that exact reason belarussian people prefer to keep their (allegedly dictatorial) president since the early 90ies, and not so because of alleged press control etc – they do get western POV through ukrainian and pro-SPS russian media. A revolution is only possible in the case where people are de facto dissatisfied with the situation, as in Ukraine (economy) and Georgia (nationalism).

      • eye says:

        Ah, to expand on the list of countries which retained their economy, baltic countries (Estonia/Latvia/Lithuana) have retained a somewhat western type economy similar to Poland all along and were never a core part of the soviet economic system, i believe. Kirgizistan also seemed to do fairly OK for a small country which happened to be cut off, but don’t ask me for the exact details. I’m from a Russian border region of Ukraine originally, so i guess that’s what i know most about, plus Belarussia. I have been residing in Germany for most of my conscious life now.

  34. Sacrament says:

    ‘This kind of bag was called “Avoska” it was widely used across all Soviet Union. In these one you can see empty bottles from vodka and milk.’

    Not vodka and milk, but lemonade and milk.

    • dresiwo says:

      @Sacrament: Not lemonade but vodka. All vodka brands were sold in such bottles, but with different labels. E.g. Stolichnaya was red, and this one is Limonnaya (Lemon vodka)

  35. Dan says:

    Actually, during prohibition, you could also get alcohol legally, a doctor could write you a scrip for some whiskey, for your ‘nerves’. Speakeasys were rampant as well.

  36. 随着我国物流业(货架)的快速发展,整个华东地区物流业托盘的发展也正以物流服务塑料托盘提升到较国内其他地区更高的地位而推进。重视具有提升区域物流托盘效率功能的专业化和标准化物流
    塑料托盘基础设施建设,打造整体物仓储笼流服务平台。
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  37. OLUT says:

    “Proofread” is one word, not two. Also, “English” should be capitalized.

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